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We at Xyna International Virtual High School believe that high school diploma is a base of every successful individual. Education is important as it teaches us the right behavior, the good manners thus making us civilized. It teaches us how to lead our lives. Education forms a support system for talents to excel in life. It is the backbone of society. Completing high school is the first step. High school courses will give you the skills and background you need to succeed. You might not need or want post-secondary education, though - and that's ok. Finishing some or all of your high school credits is usually required for many jobs or training in the trades.

As of December 20, 2006, all students under 18 years of age are required to be in attendance at school unless they have already graduated or are otherwise excused from attendance at school. Legal reasons for being absent from school (e.g. receiving satisfactory instruction at home or elsewhere) continue to apply.

Xyna International Virtual High School has established objectives to ensure that each student has the maximum opportunity to learn. The achievement of these objectives depends upon the shared responsibilities of students, teachers, and parents.

  • To provide the tradition of excellence in academics, personal growth.
  • To develop a feeling of self-worth through accomplishments, discipline and respect for oneself and others.
  • To encourage self-motivation so that students take a responsible role in their own education.
  • To create a positive learning & Stress Free environment through shared responsibility of teachers, students and parents.
  • To prepare students for the world of work by developing productivity, punctuality, and pride in work.

Our students are expected to develop their potential as individuals and to become contributing, responsible members of society, who will think clearly, feel deeply, and act wisely.

Xyna International Virtual High School is an Ontario-based private high school specializing in education programs for students. All courses offered by Xyna International High School are authorized by the Ontario Ministry of Education and provide students with an opportunity to earn credits towards their high school diploma. With over 100 courses available, Xyna International Virtual High School can also supplement the current education delivery system in any region or locale. This allows students worldwide to complete or upgrade their education, utilizing e-learning technology from any place at any time of day or night.

At Xyna International Virtual High School we recognize that education must adapt and find ways to accommodate students with specialized needs, learning styles and schedules. We work with many public schools, private schools, tutoring centres and various other institutions to provide students with an alternative learning option while they are completing course(s) required to obtain their Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

We provide online high school education for many types of students including:

  • Students who would like to add an online course to their existing high school timetable;
  • Learners who are seeking entry into a college or university program and need to take a make-up course or a necessary prerequisite that their own local high school is not offering;
  • Students with health related issues or special learning needs who require access to an alternative learning program that will lead to graduation with an Ontario Secondary School Diploma;
  • Students who are pursuing careers in professional athletics, theatre or arts and must travel a great deal during the school year;
  • Adult students who are working full time and require a more flexible schedule;
  • Students who are temporarily relocated outside of Ontario and who would like to continue working towards their OSSD;
  • International students seeking a quality high school curriculum that will qualify them for entrance into university or college programs in Canada, the UK and around the world.

At Xyna International Virtual High School, we provide an extensive selection of courses for students to choose from which are often part of a wider selection not currently available at their daytime high school. Students can combine Xyna International High School courses with their regular classroom timetable and capitalize on the freedom of an online program designed to meet their needs.

To optimize your Xyna International Virtual High School experience, access your online course using an up-to-date PC with a high-speed internet connection.

Recommended configuration:
Hardware:
  • Dual-core PC with 2GB of RAM (or higher)
  • 20GB of free disk space (or higher)
  • Monitor, keyboard, mouse, sound card, speakers
  • Headset with microphone (required for some courses)
  • High-speed internet connection (56KB or higher)
  • Scanner or camera (useful for sending in work completed by hand)
Software:
  • Microsoft Operating System (Windows 7 or 8 preferred)
  • Latest version of Internet Explorer or Google Chrome
Internet Browser Requirements

Xyna International Virtual High School online courses work best in Internet Explorer and Firefox; we recommend that students who are using an Apple computer access courses using Firefox. Other browsers and mobile devices are not recommended as they may or may not support all of the online classroom features.

Students should also check to see if their browser has any toolbars installed that may block pop-ups, and disable their pop-up blocking feature while accessing the online course site. It is recommended that the following requirements be met when accessing the online classroom:

  • Pop-ups are enabled;
  • Cookies are enabled; and,
  • Java is installed, up-to-date and enabled (http://www.java.com).

Please note that Xyna International Virtual High School only provides support for Internet Explorer and Firefox issues.

Students may register for courses through the school website at www.xyna.ca or www.ehighschool.ca or by calling the Xyna International Virtual High School Admissions Office. Xyna International High School is open all year long and operates on a weekly registration cycle. Any students who have registered by Friday at 5 p.m. EST, will start their course on the following Wednesday after 6 p.m. EST; providing that all of the required documents and tuition fees have been received. When necessary, a student may also request a specific start date be arranged in advance. During the registration process, all students must supply copies of the following documents:

  • Ontario Student Transcript (OST), Credit Summary or Local School Transcript translated into English.
  • A copy of one of the following documents:
    • Birth certificate
    • Driver’s license
    • Passport
    • Citizenship card
  • Parent Permission form (students under the age of 18)
  • Consent for Release of Documents form
  • Proof of course pre-requisite

Mature students with related prior learning or work experience may apply for an exemption from a prerequisite.

Students with special learning or medical needs should submit their Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or medical records at the time of registration so teachers may provide adequate support during courses.

Course Prerequisites

In order for a course to be properly taught and understood, instructors depend on their students to have and know the required background knowledge and skills. Students are responsible for ensuring they have obtained the necessary prerequisite for a course.

“If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived” (MOE, 2011a, S. 7.2.3).

Students, who do not have a course prerequisite, yet can provide reasonable evidence of prior equivalent study or work experiences may apply for a prerequisite exemption or obtain a letter of permission from their local school to obtain an exemption from a prerequisite. Students will be required to submit their school grades and all relevant work/school experience before their request is reviewed. Incomplete applications will automatically be denied.

Students who enroll in a course for which they do not have a prerequisite, and who have not obtained an exemption from the prerequisite or Letter of Permission to waive the prerequisite, may be removed from their course at any time. No tuition refund shall be granted.

Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflects how well students are achieving the curriculum expectations. As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s work on the basis of established achievement criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. In Ontario secondary schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade.

Students are assessed and evaluated based on the Achievement Charts in the Provincial Curriculum Policy Documents for the courses in which they are enrolled. Evaluation is based on the level of achievement the student demonstrates in the skills and knowledge covered in a course. 70% of the final mark is based on classroom work for Knowledge & Understanding, Thinking, Communications and Application. Assessment is determined through a variety of methods such as ongoing class demonstrations, presentations, essays, performances and classroom tests and quizzes. 30% of the final mark is based on a final summative evaluation that may be determined through a variety of methods in the latter portion of the course. These could include a portfolio, essay, examination and/or demonstration. This final evaluation reflects the range and level of student skills and knowledge towards the conclusion of the course. At the beginning of each course, students receive an outline of the course evaluation from each teacher. This outline includes the assessment of academic achievement and learning skills. Student progress is formally reported to parents at mid-semester and end of semester.

Course content (including Online and Offline activities) is designed to be 110 hours of planned learning activities (approximate time allocations accompany course units and/or activities). Credit is granted only on the completion of the Course with minimum 110 hours of Learning. One or more of the following approaches is used to account for the 110 hours for full-credit courses.

  • Students log in on a regular basis and engage in learning activities with teachers and other students
  • Student presence tracked by course software or via contributions to the discussion areas
  • Students maintain a learning log documenting Online and Offline activities
  • Teacher tracks student activity through regular and ongoing communication
  • Teacher verifies that student work belongs to the student enrolled in the course through regular review of student work
  • If the student cancels his/her course prior to the first student portal login, they will receive partial refund of tuition charges. Admin Fee of $100 will be deducted.
  • If the student cancels course after the starting the classes, the tuition fee will be not refundable.
  • If the school cancels or discontinues a course, the school will make a full refund of all tuition you have paid for that course.

Respect is the basic principle by which we operate at Xyna International Virtual High School. Students, parents and guardians must conduct communications with Xyna International High School staff and each other in a respectful manner; in return students shall receive respect from all members of the school, both academic and non-academic. This ensures the rights of all students to study and learn in a confirmatory environment. Xyna International Virtual High School is a place of learning and as such, there must be an atmosphere based on mutual respect, concern and a desire to get the best education possible. Students are expected to be courteous and to respect the personal rights and feelings of others.

Insults, disrespect, and other hurtful acts disrupt learning and teaching in a school community. Members of the school community have a responsibility to maintain an environment where conflict and difference can be addressed in a manner characterized by respect and civility. (Ministry of Education [MOE], 2001, p. 3)

Xyna International Virtual High School is committed to the protection and well-being of all students and staff. As part of this commitment, our school has a zero tolerance policy on harassment, intimidation, threatening behaviours (verbal or otherwise) and/or conduct injurious to the moral tone of the school. Profanity, harassment or aggressive behaviours are not acceptable and may result in student suspension or expulsion. The Xyna International Virtual High School Code of Conduct helps students fully develop as responsible contributing members to their online learning environment.

Courses at Xyna International Virtual High School are designed to meet the needs of students requiring a flexible study schedule, and who have distinctive demands in everyday life. Students are able to select the time of day, as well as which days during the week or weekend that they will work on their courses.

Xyna International Virtual High School’s primary objective is student achievement of the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum requirements. In keeping with this objective, the concept of missed or late assignments is nonexistent. Students are expected to log into to their course and submit assignments on a regular basis; however, students are given timelines in each of their courses for the sole purpose of providing a guideline for achieving their course credit in a three month time-frame. Students may establish their own schedules for regularly submitting assignments and extend the duration of their course(s) at any time they deem necessary (additional tuition fees will apply). All Xyna International Virtual High School courses must be completed within a maximum of one year. This limit preserves the integrity of the academic assessment and evaluation policies as provided by the Ministry of Education in Ontario.

As an online school, Xyna International Virtual High School does not accept course assignments via Canada Post, courier or other forms of “snail” mail. Students are encouraged and recommended to complete all assignments electronically. In math and science courses, it can sometimes be difficult for students to express ideas using word processing technologies. If students feel they need to submit a handwritten assignment, the assignment should be scanned and emailed directly to the applicable teacher or to be uploaded on School portal. Xyna International Virtual High School does not recommend submitting work by fax, as often the quality of fax is so low it can be difficult for teachers to read.

It must be made clear to students early in the school year that they are responsible not only for their behaviour in the classroom and the school but also for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall expectations within the time frame specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher. Students must understand that there will be consequences for not completing assignments for evaluation or for submitting those assignments late.

Xyna has strategies which are used to help prevent & address late and missed assignments. These include:

  • Asking the student to clarify the reason for not completing the assignment.
  • Helping students develop better time-management skills.
  • Collaborating with other staff to prepare a part- or full-year calendar of major assignment dates for every class.
  • Planning for major assignments to be completed in stages, so that students are less likely to be faced with an all-or-nothing situation at the last minute.
  • Maintaining ongoing communication with students and/or parents about due dates and late assignments, and scheduling conferences with parents if the problem persists.
  • Taking into consideration legitimate reasons for missed deadlines.
  • Using counselling or peer tutoring to try to deal positively with problems.
  • Reviewing the need for extra support for English language learners.
  • Reviewing whether students require special education services.
  • Providing alternative assignments or tests/exams where, it is reasonable and appropriate to do so.
  • Deducting marks for late assignments, up to and including the full value of the assignment.

It is expected that teachers and school teams will use a variety of strategies, as described above, to ensure that students submit their assignments for evaluation and meet timelines. Late and missed assignments for evaluation will also be noted on the report card as part of the evaluation of a student’s development of the learning skills and work habits. When appropriate, a student’s tendency to be late in submitting, or to fail to submit, other assignments (including homework) may also be noted on the report card as part of the evaluation of the student’s development of the learning skills and work habits.

Our policies relating to late and missed assignments for evaluation are:

  • to inform students and their parents about the importance of submitting assignments for evaluation when they are due and about the consequences for students who submit assignments late or fail to submit assignments.
  • recognize that policies and procedures to motivate and facilitate completion of work and demonstration of learning and allow for additional & alternative opportunities to do so.
  • recognize that it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher, in collaboration with students, to establish deadlines for the submission of assignments for evaluation and clearly communicate those deadlines to students and, where appropriate, to parents.
  • ensure that mark deduction will not result in a percentage mark that misrepresents the student’s actual achievement.
  • provide clear procedures for determining a percentage mark for the report card for a student.

Plagiarism is an act of theft known by many names: cheating, borrowing, stealing or copying. Plagiarism is intentionally or unintentionally using another person’s words or ideas and presenting these as one’s own. It includes submitting an essay written by another student, allowing a student to submit your work, obtaining one from the many services provided on the Internet or copying sections from various documents and not acknowledging the original source. It is a serious offence that may result in significant academic consequences.

Students must understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned. Xyna has strategies for helping students understand the gravity of such behaviour and the importance of acknowledging the work of others. We work on prevention of cheating and plagiarizing, detection of incidents of cheating and plagiarizing and consequences for students who cheat or plagiarize.

Xyna International Virtual High School requires academic honesty from all students. This requires students to always submit original work and to give credit to all research sources correctly and consistently.

All Grades 11 and 12 courses are subjected to the Ministry of Education’s Full Disclosure Policy. All courses in which a student is registered three days after the issue of each semester’s midterm report will be recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST) whether the course has been successfully completed or not. A withdrawal is recorded on the OST by entering a “W” in the “Credit” column. The Student’s percentage Grade at the time of the withdrawal is recorded in the “Percentage Grade” column. Students, who repeat a Grade 11 or 12 courses that they have previously completed, only earn one credit for the course. However, each attempt as well as the percentage grade obtained is recorded on the OST, and an R is entered in the “Credit” column for the course(s) with the lower percentage grade.

Any use of Xyna International Virtual High School’s e-Learning Portal for unlawful activities is prohibited. Xyna International Virtual High School will investigate all such occurrences and, in the process, may involve and cooperate with law enforcement authorities. Any access violations of the Xyna International Virtual High School e-Learning Portal may result in the dismissal of a student, or other remedy as provided by law enforcement. Unacceptable use includes:

  • Defamation: Causing a statement to be read by others, that is likely to injure the reputation of a person by exposing that person to hatred, contempt, or ridicule, or that is designed to insult the person.
  • Harassment: Sending, without lawful authority, electronic messages that cause people to fear for their safety or for the safety of those they know.
  • Hate propaganda: Disseminating messages or statements that promote hatred or incite violence against identifiable groups. Sending abusive, sexist, or racist messages to anyone via e-mail or voice mail.
  • Interception of private communications or electronic mail (in transit): Unlawfully intercepting someone’s private communications or unlawfully intercepting someone’s e-mail messages.
  • Obscenity: Distributing, publishing, or possessing, for the purpose of distributing or publicly displaying, any obscene material. Uploading inappropriate pictures into the student learning portal.
  • Hacking and other crimes related to computer security:
    • Gaining unauthorized access to a computer system: using someone else’s password to access the Xyna International Virtual High School e-learning portal, network or technology systems
    • Attempting to defeat electronic security features by using anti security programs; by using someone else’s password, user identification, or computer account; by disclosing personal passwords; by providing network configuration information or access codes to others; or by disabling anti-virus programs.
    • Spreading computer viruses with intent to cause harm.
    • Destroying, altering, or encrypting data without authorization, and with the intent of making it inaccessible to those with a need to access it.
  • Causing the congestion or disruption of electronic networks and systems by sending chain letters, promoting SPAM, or receiving list server electronic mail unrelated to a work purpose.
    • Forging any TCP/IP packet header or any part of the header information in any e-mail or newsgroup posting
    • Engaging in electronic network mischief such as “spoofing,” using IP addresses without consultation, network sniffing, etc...; attempting to probe, scan, or test the vulnerability of a system or network or to breach security or authentication measures
  • Copyright Infringement: No aspect of Xyna International Virtual High School’s Intellectual Property or Trademarks may be reproduced in any form or by any means, except as expressly permitted by Xyna International Virtual High School’s prior written consent.

As part of the diploma requirements, students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities. These activities may be completed at any time during their years in the secondary school program. Students, in collaboration with their parents, will decide how they will fulfill the community involvement requirement. Student can start before grade 9 in summers.

Community involvement activities may take place in a variety of settings, including businesses, not-for-profit organizations, public sector institutions (including hospitals), and informal settings. Students may not fulfil the requirement through activities that are counted towards a credit (cooperative education and work experience, for example), through paid work, or by assuming duties normally performed by a paid employee.

The requirement is to be completed outside students’ normal instructional hours – that is, the activities are to take place in students’ designated lunch hours, after school, on weekends, or during school holidays. Students will maintain and provide a record of their community involvement activities. Completion of the required 40 hours must be confirmed by the organizations or persons supervising the activities. Documentation attesting to the completion of each activity must be submitted to the principal by the student. This documentation must include for each activity the name of the person or organization receiving the service, the activity performed, the dates and hours, the signatures of the student and his or her parents, and a signed acknowledgement by the person (or a representative of the organization) involved.

Consultation with the principal may be required for certain volunteer activities.

Procedures for Students

Students may complete the 40 hours of community involvement activities at any time during their secondary school program. They may also complete any number of activities, as long as those activities result in the completion of 40 hours of community involvement. Students under the age of eighteen years will plan and select their community involvement activities in consultation with their parents.

Before beginning any community involvement activity, each student must complete and submit a “Notification of Planned Community Involvement Activities” form. A student under the age of eighteen must complete the form in consultation with his or her parents, and must also have one parent sign the form. The student will sign the form and submit it to the principal.

When the activity is completed, the student must fill out the “Completion of Community Involvement Activities” form. The sponsor of the activity – that is, the person or organization that provided the community involvement activity – will complete the appropriate sections of the form to verify that the activity has been completed, and will sign the form. The form must also be signed by one of the student's parents if the student is under eighteen years of age. The student must submit the form to the principal upon completion of the 40 hours, or at appropriate intervals determined by the principal.

Ineligible Activities

The ministry has developed a list of activities that may not be chosen as community involvement activities. These are referred to as ineligible activities. An ineligible activity is an activity that:

  • is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (e.g., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience);
  • take place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student's lunch breaks or “spare” periods is permissible;
  • takes place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under sixteen years of age;
  • takes place in a factory, if the student is under fifteen years of age;
  • takes place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace;
  • involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools, or scaffolding;
  • involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons;
  • involves handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewellery, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • consists of duties normally performed in the home (i.e., daily chores) or personal recreational activities;
  • involves activities for a court-ordered program (e.g., community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

The digital age has provided students with increased opportunities for learning. For many students, this may be their first time taking a high school course online and they are at the beginning of an exciting education journey.

Parents and guardians play a vital role in student success in high school e-learning programs. The greater the support that families provide for their children’s learning and educational progress, the more likely that their children will do well in school and continue on with their education (MOE, 2010c). Parental involvement can include helping one’s child create a custom schedule for his or her online course, checking in each week to ensure assignments are being submitted on a regular basis, and providing homework support when needed.

Xyna International Virtual High School uses a variety of methods to keep parents up-to-date on school news, coming events, and their child’s progress:

  • School Portal
  • Newsletters, updates and information
  • Teacher feedback emails

In order to keep parents informed of their son/daughter’s progress, parents with students under the age of 18 may request to receive an email copy of all teacher correspondence and feedback provided to their child as he or she progresses through his/her course. This allows parents to have a greater involvement in their child’s instruction and creates a transparent communication process between students, parents and teachers. Students who are 18 years of age and older who would like their parents to receive a copy of their teacher feedback reports should complete and submit a Consent for Release of Personal Information form.

Each Online course is offered and accessed online. No matter where they are – at home, the library or an Internet café – students can access their courses through any computer with Internet access. Every course has compulsory assignments that are located on an exclusive website. On this same site, there are also discussion boards where students can communicate with their instructor and classmates. Each full credit course is 110 hours and scheduled to take Maximum 5 months to complete. Students may set their own pace and study schedule to correspond with personal timelines and needs. Students interested in extending the study period for their course may do so; however, additional tuition fees will apply.

Xyna International Virtual High School teachers manage their online classes in a manner similar to traditional classroom courses and will respond to any student queries within 1 business day. Evaluation assignments are returned to students within 5-7 business days. Students must achieve the Ministry of Education learning expectations of a course and complete 110 hours of planned learning activities in order to earn a course credit. Students must also keep a learning log throughout their course which outlines the activities they have completed and their total learning hours. The learning log creates a formal record of student attendance and assignment submission in each course.

Submission of Assignments

Courses at Xyna International Virtual High School are designed to meet the needs of students requiring a flexible study schedule, and who have distinctive demands in everyday life. Students are able to select the time of day, as well as which days during the week or weekend that they will work on their courses.

Xyna International Virtual High School’s primary objective is student achievement of the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum requirements. In keeping with this objective, the concept of missed or late assignments is nonexistent. Students are expected to log into to their course and submit assignments on a regular basis; however, students are given timelines in each of their courses for the sole purpose of providing a guideline for achieving their course credit in a three month time-frame. Students may establish their own schedules for regularly submitting assignments and extend the duration of their course(s) at any time they deem necessary (additional tuition fees will apply). All Xyna International Virtual High School courses must be completed within a maximum of one year. This limit preserves the integrity of the academic assessment and evaluation policies as provided by the Ministry of Education in Ontario.

As an online high school, Xyna International Virtual High School does not accept course assignments via Canada Post, courier or other forms of “snail” mail. Students are encouraged and recommended to complete all assignments electronically. In math and science courses, it can sometimes be difficult for students to express ideas using word processing technologies. If students feel they need to submit a handwritten assignment, the assignment should be scanned and emailed directly to the applicable teacher or to be uploaded on School portal. Xyna International Virtual High School does not recommend submitting work by fax, as often the quality of fax is so low it can be difficult for teachers to read.

Turnaround Times (Teacher Assistance and Marks)

While Xyna International Virtual High School endeavours to provide students with everything they will need, there are often times when students have questions for their teachers. Teachers will respond to course questions within 1 business day of receiving an email. For example, if an email question is received by a Xyna International High School teacher on Tuesday evening – a response will be issued by Wednesday evening. If an email question is received Friday evening, the teacher has until Monday evening to respond.

  • Course Questions 1 business day
  • Evaluation Assignments 5-7 business days
  • Tests 5-7 business days
  • Booking Final Examinations (Ontario students) 5 business days
  • Booking Final Examinations (out of province students) 5-8 business days
  • Issuing of Report Cards 10 business days after the final exam is written

It is important for students to receive feedback from their teacher as they proceed through their course; as such, student assignments should be emailed as soon as they are completed. Students should not send their teacher large units of work at one time; it will delay the teacher’s ability to provide timely feedback on a student’s progress. Tests, large assignments and Independent Study Units may take up to 7 business days to mark and return.

Teacher Live Chat Times

Teachers have live office hours on each week; students should be sure to take advantage of this one-on-one time. It’s a great opportunity to discuss the course and ask questions about tests and assignments. Online office hours and other information for teachers are posted in the announcements area of each course.

Putting an Online Course on Hold

Xyna International Virtual High School understands that students sometimes need to take time off from their course to deal with personal matters. To assist students in such a situation, students are offered the option to put their course on hold. This allows students to take time away from their studies without losing any allotted learning time in their course. When a course is put on hold, students will be temporarily removed from their class in the Xyna International Virtual High School learning portal without academic penalty.

All students must complete their course within one year of their original course start date. This means that all assignments, tests, discussion postings, projects and final exams must be completed prior to the one year anniversary of the course start date. It is the responsibility of students who put a course on hold to ensure that they reactivate their course at such a time as to allow them to complete all course requirements, including the final exam, before their course reaches the one year mark. An administration fee will apply at the time of course reactivation.

To earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma, a student must:

  • Earn 30 credits (18 compulsory and 12 optional credits)
  • Complete 40 hours of community involvement activities
  • Complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test Successfully
18 compulsory credits

Students must earn the following compulsory credits to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma:

  • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)*
  • 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in the arts
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in French as a second language
  • 0.5 credit in career studies
  • 0.5 credit in civics

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

  • 1 additional credit (group 1): additional credit in English, or French as a second language,** or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 2): additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language,** or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 3): additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language,** or computer studies, or cooperative education***

*A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course.

**In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3.

***A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits.

†The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.

12 Optional Credits

In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must earn 12 optional credits. Students may earn these credits by successfully completing courses that they have selected from the courses available in the school course calendar.

Compulsory and Optional Credits must equal a minimum of 30 credits

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided that they have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows:

Compulsory Credits (total of 7)
  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Canadian History or Canadian Geography
  • 1 credit in Mathematics
  • 1 credit in Science
  • 1 credit in Health and Physical education
  • 1 credit in the Arts or Technological Education
  • Optional Credits (total of 7)

Students who leave school before fulfilling the requirements for the OSSD or the OSSC may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment (COA). This certificate may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain vocational programs or other kinds of further training. Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses will have their transcript updated, but will not be issued a new COA.

All students must successfully complete the provincial secondary school literacy requirement in order to earn a secondary school diploma. It will be based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication – particularly reading and writing.

This will serve both to determine whether students have acquired the reading and writing skills considered essential for literacy and to provide confirmation that those students who have completed the requirement successfully have attained the provincial expectations for literacy.

Students who pass the course are considered to have met the literacy graduation requirement.

The course differs from other courses in that it outlines specific requirements for evaluation in order to ensure alignment with the requirements of the OSSLT.

The credit earned for successfully completing the OSSLC may be used to meet the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 compulsory credit requirement in English. If used to meet the Grade 11 requirement, the course is coded OLC3O. If used to meet the Grade 12 requirement, the course is coded OLC4O. The credit may also be used to meet the group 1 compulsory credit requirement for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Students should check admission requirements for postsecondary institutions, since the OSSLC may not be accepted as the Grade 12 English entrance requirement for college or university programs.

The OSSLC may be used as a substitution to meet the requirements for compulsory credits.

Accommodations

A student who has been formally identified as students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) are entitled to receive the accommodations. These accommodations must be consistent with those available to the student completing his or her regular school work, including examinations and other forms of evaluation.

Special Provisions

Special provisions are available for English language learners (ELLs) such as additional time, periodic supervised breaks, and an individual or small group setting. The principal, in consultation with the student and the parents/guardians, or the adult student, will determine which special provisions should be provided to support the student.

Deferrals

The principal, in consultation with the student and the parent(s)/guardian(s), or the adult student, will determine if a deferral should be granted. Deferred students are expected to write the OSSLT during its next administration.

Deferrals are intended for:

  • ELL students who have not yet acquired a level of proficiency in English to successfully complete the OSSLT; • Students who have been identified as exceptional and would not be able to participate even if all accommodations were provided;
  • Students who have not yet acquired the reading and writing skills appropriate for Grade 9; and
  • Students who are unable to write due to illness, injury or other extenuating circumstances.
Exemptions

A student must have an IEP that clearly indicates he or she is not working towards a secondary school diploma in order to be exempted from writing the OSSLT. The principal, in consultation with the parent(s)/guardian(s) and student, will make all decisions regarding exemptions.

Substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credit courses using courses from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. To meet individual students’ needs, principals may replace up to three of these courses (or the equivalent in half courses) with courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. In all cases, however, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than thirty for students aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and not less than fourteen for those aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to meet special needs and interests.

The decision to make a substitution for a student should be made only if the student’s educational interests are best served by such substitution. If a parent or an adult student requests a substitution, the principal will determine whether or not a substitution should be made. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a substitution should be made. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff. Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript

Policy on Substitutions for Compulsory Courses

The principal has the discretion to make substitutions for a maximum of three compulsory courses at the secondary level to address the specific needs of student to be graduated. Substitutions for compulsory credit requirements serve a variety of purposes:

  • allow flexibility in designing a student’s program pathway;
  • ensure that all students can qualify for the secondary school diploma or certificate;
  • promote and enhance student learning;
  • meet special needs and interests.

Xyna will use an “X” to indicate credits that are substitutions for compulsory credits identified by the ministry as diploma requirements. (Such substitutions can only be made with the approval of the principal.) For these credits, also an “X” should be entered in the “Note” column of student’s transcript.

A credit is a means of recognition of the successful completion of a course for which a minimum of 110 hours has been scheduled. It is granted to the student by the principal of a secondary school on behalf of the Minister of Education.

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education and Training for courses that have been developed or approved by the ministry. A half credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry-developed course. Half-credit courses must comply with ministry requirements as outlined in the curriculum policy documents.

Subject Grade Course Type

The first three characters of the course code refers to the name of the course.

The fourth character refers to the grade of the course.
1 = Grade 9
2 = Grade 10
3 = Grade 11
4 = Grade 12

The fifth character refers to the type of course.
P = applied
D = academic
O = open
E = workplace prep
C = college prep
U = university prep
M = university / college preparation

The school year is divided into two equal parts and a student is expected to complete half of his/her program each semester. The first semester begins September 1st and ends in January. The second semester begins immediately following the conclusion of the 1st semester and ends at the conclusion of the required time for the courses. Students may enter the program in the 1st or 2nd semester. We also offer summer credit courses during July and August and each student is able to take one credit in each month.

The types of courses available in the secondary school program are described below.

  • In Grades 9 and 10, three types of courses are offered: academic courses, applied courses, and open courses.
  • In Grades 11 and 12, courses offered to prepare students for their postsecondary destinations include: university preparation courses, university/college preparation courses, college preparation courses, and workplace preparation courses. Open courses are also offered in Grades 11 & 12
Academic Courses

Academic courses draw more heavily on theory and abstract examples and problems. In an academic course, you will learn the essential concepts of a subject and explore related materials as well. Although your knowledge and skill in the subject will be developed through both theory and practical applications, the emphasis will be on theory and abstract thinking as a basis for future learning and problem solving.

Applied Courses

Applied courses focus more on practical applications and concrete examples. An applied course covers the essential concepts of a subject. Knowledge and skills will be developed through both theory and practical applications, but the focus will be on practical applications. Familiar, real-life situations will be used to illustrate ideas and students will be given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts you studied.

Open Courses

In subjects such as healthy active living education, computer applications, integrated technologies visual arts and instrumental music, all students will take the same type of course – an open course.

University Preparation Courses

University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for university programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize theoretical aspects of the course content but will also include concrete applications. All university preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. Students will also be required to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

University/College Preparation Courses

University/College preparation courses include content that is relevant for both university and college programs. These courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific university and college programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for college and university programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize both theoretical aspects and related concrete applications of the course content. All University/College preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. Students will also be required to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

College Preparation Courses

College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for college programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for most college programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize concrete applications of the theoretical material covered in the course, and will also emphasize the development of critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. All college preparation courses will be based on rigorous provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize the development of both independent research skills and independent learning skills. Courses will also require students to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

The Students, Parents and Guardians will be able to access the course outlines by visiting the online school website at www.ehighschool.ca

The Students, Parents and Guardians will be able to access the course outlines by visiting Ministry of Education website at www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary

Some students, after successfully completing a certain type of course, may change their educational goals and, as a consequence, may need to take compulsory and optional credit courses of a different type from those they initially chose. Although students enrolled in one type of course may enrol in a different type of course in a subsequent year, changing course types becomes more difficult as students advance through the system, or in situations involving courses that have prerequisites (see Prerequisite Courses). Nevertheless, a variety of options exist to enable students to make the transition. When a student plans to switch from one course type in Grade 9 to the other in Grade 10 in the same subject, the principal must inform the student and his or her parents that the student will be strongly encouraged to successfully complete additional course work of up to 30 hours and as defined by the ministry in order to demonstrate achievement of the learning expectations that are included in the one Grade 9 course but not the other. This additional course work can be taken in summer school or in a program outside the regular school hours or during the school day. A student wishing to change course types between Grades 10 and 11 and/or Grades 11 and 12 may, for example:

  • take a transfer course that will bridge the gap between course types;
  • take a course of another type (e.g., academic) that will satisfy the prerequisites for a course in a higher grade (e.g., a university preparation course) that the student wishes to take;
  • take a summer course or undertake independent study to achieve the uncompleted expectations that are required to enter the new program.

For students who are re-entering secondary school in order to complete their diploma requirements, boards are encouraged to provide re-entry programs to assist the students in making the transition back to secondary school. Students could take such programs in an alternative setting (e.g., a workplace).

Effective assessment, evaluation, and reporting provide information about student achievement, and a basis for improving both instructional programs and student achievement. A well-designed system of assessing, evaluating, and reporting, based on clearly stated curriculum expectations and achievement criteria, allows teachers to focus on high standards of achievement for all students, and promotes a consistent practice across Ontario.

The primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning”. As part of assessment for learning, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback and coaching for improvement. Teachers engage in assessment as learning by helping all students develop their capacity to be independent, autonomous learners who are able to set individual goals, monitor their own progress, determine next steps, and reflect on their thinking and learning. Information gathered through assessment and evaluation helps teachers to identify students’ difficulties as well as to detect weaknesses in programs. Assessment and evaluation are thus important tools for adapting curriculum and instructional approaches to students’ needs and for determining the overall effectiveness of programs and classroom practices.

Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflects how well students are achieving the curriculum expectations. As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s work on the basis of established achievement criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. In Ontario secondary schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade.

Assessment and evaluation will be based on the provincial curriculum expectations and the achievement levels outlined in the secondary curriculum policy documents. Teachers will be provided with materials, including samples of student work that will assist them in their assessment of student achievement.

As essential steps in assessment for learning and as learning, teachers will:

  • plan assessment concurrently and integrate it seamlessly with instruction;
  • share learning goals and success criteria with students at the outset of learning to ensure that students and teachers have a common and shared understanding of these goals and criteria as learning progresses;
  • gather information about student learning before, during, and at or near the end of a period of instruction, using a variety of assessment strategies and tools;
  • use assessment to inform instruction, guide next steps, and help students monitor their progress towards achieving their learning goals;
  • analyse and interpret evidence of learning;
  • give and receive specific and timely descriptive feedback about student learning;
  • help students to develop skills of peer and self-assessment;

Assessment is based on evidence of student achievement of the provincial curriculum expectations. Teachers will ensure that students’ demonstration of their achievement is assessed in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories of the achievement chart and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories. All specific expectations must be accounted for in instruction and assessment however Evaluation focuses on students’ achievement of the overall expectations.

Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student learning on the basis of established performance standards (see Chapter 3) and assigning a value to represent that quality. Evaluation accurately summarizes and communicates to parents, other teachers, employers, institutions of further education, and students themselves what students know and can do with respect to the overall curriculum expectations. Evaluation is based on assessment of learning that provides evidence of student achievement at strategic times throughout the grade/course, often at the end of a period of learning

Evidence of student achievement for evaluation is collected over time from three different sources – observations, conversations, and student products, using multiple sources of evidence increases the reliability and validity of the evaluation of student learning.

“Student products” may be in the form of tests or exams and/or assignments for evaluation. Assignments for evaluation may include rich performance tasks, demonstrations, projects, and/or essays. To ensure equity for all students, assignments for evaluation and tests or exams are to be completed, whenever possible, under the supervision of a teacher. Assignments for evaluation must not include ongoing homework that students do in order to consolidate their knowledge and skills or to prepare for the next class. Assignments for evaluation may involve group projects as long as each student’s work within the group project is evaluated independently and assigned an individual mark, as opposed to a common group mark.

In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation strategies that:

  • address both what students learn and how well they learn;
  • are based on both the categories of knowledge and skills and the achievement level descriptions in the achievement chart for each discipline;
  • are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students;
  • are fair to all students;
  • accommodate the needs of exceptional students;
  • accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction;
  • ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement;
  • promote students’ ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals;
  • include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of each course and at other appropriate points throughout the course

Students are assessed and evaluated based on the Achievement Charts in the Provincial Curriculum Policy Documents for the courses in which they are enrolled. Evaluation is based on the level of achievement the student demonstrates in the skills and knowledge covered in a course. 70% of the final mark is based on classroom work for Knowledge & Understanding, Thinking, Communications and Application. Assessment is determined through a variety of methods such as ongoing class demonstrations, presentations, essays, performances and classroom tests and quizzes. 30% of the final mark is based on a final summative evaluation that may be determined through a variety of methods in the latter portion of the course. These could include a portfolio, essay, examination and/or demonstration. This final evaluation reflects the range and level of student skills and knowledge towards the conclusion of the course. At the beginning of each course, students receive an outline of the course evaluation from each teacher. This outline includes the assessment of academic achievement and learning skills. Student progress is formally reported to parents at mid-semester and end of semester. Formal parent-teacher conferences occur after the distribution of mid-semester reports.

Achievement Levels

Degrees of achievement or “Levels” are organized into broad learning categories, which are:

  • knowledge / understanding
  • thinking / inquiry
  • communication
  • application / making connections

While they are broad in scope and general in nature, the achievement levels serve as a guide for gathering information, and act as a framework used to assess and evaluate each student’s achievement. As such, they enable teachers to make consistent judgments about the quality of work, and provide clear and specific information about their achievement to students and their parents.

  • Seventy per cent of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be give to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • Thirty percent of the grade will be based on a final evaluation in the form of an examination, performance, essay, and/or other method of evaluation suitable to the course content and administered towards the end of the course.

The following table provides a summary description of achievement in each percentage grade range and corresponding level of achievement:

Percentage Grade Range Achievement Level Summary Description
80 – 100% Level 4 A very high outstanding level of achievement. Achievement is above the provincial standard.
70 – 79% Level 3 A high level of achievement. Achievement is at the provincial standard.
60 – 69% Level 2 A moderate level of achievement. Achievement is below, but approaching, the provincial standard.
50 – 59% Level 1 A passable level of achievement. Achievement is below the provincial standard.
Below 50% Insufficient achievement of curriculum expectations. A credit will not be granted.

Note: Level 3 (70 – 79%) is the provincial standard. Teachers and parent can be confident that students who are achieving at level 3 are well prepared for work in the next grade or the next course.

Reporting Student Achievement

Student achievement must be communicated formally to students and parents by means of a Report Card. The report card focuses on two distinct but related aspects of student achievement: the achievement of curriculum expectations and the development of learning skills. The report card will contain separate sections for reporting on these two areas. The report card will also include teachers’ comments on the students’ strengths, areas in which improvement is needed, and ways in which improvement might be achieved. Separate sections are provided for recording attendance and lateness in each course.

The report card provides the following skills demonstrated by the student in every course in the following categories:

  • Works Independently
  • Teamwork
  • Organization
  • Work Habits
  • Initiative

The learning skills are evaluated using a four-point scale (E – Excellent, G – Good, S – Satisfactory, N – Needs Improvement). The separate evaluation and reporting of the learning skills in these five areas reflects their critical role in students’ achievement of the curriculum expectations. The evaluation of learning skills should not be considered in the determination of percentage grades.

The Ontario Student Record is the official school record for a student. Every Ontario school keeps an OSR for each student enrolled at that school. The OSR contains achievement results, credits earned and diploma requirements completed, and other information important to the education of the student. Students and their parents (if the student is not an adult) may examine the contents of the OSR. The Education Act and freedom of information legislation protect these records.

Xyna International Virtual High School procedure to use and maintenance the OSR

The principal is responsible for use and maintenance of the OSR and for assigning tasks related to that function to appropriate staff. The organization of OSR contents outlined below is intended to be from the front to the back of the OSR:

  • Most recent OST
  • Report cards (organized chronologically with the most recent at the front)
  • Any other documentation
Review procedure:

If certain information or material in OSR folder is determined to be no longer conductive to the improvement of the instruction of the student, the principal may authorize the removal of item(s). Security for information contained in the OSR must be provided during the period of use, retention or storage. The OSR should be reviewed by the principal, or the principal’s designate. This will help ensure that the information is relevant, accurate, and conductive to the student’s education.

An OSR will be established for each student who enrols in Xyna International High School as home school. Any part or parts of the OSR may be micro recorded and stored electronically in a manner that permits the printing of a clear and legible reproduction. Provision should be made to retain original documents when it is important to keep an original signature or initial on a document. Any micro recording, electronic file, reproduction, or facsimile of an OSR is subject to the security and access requirements applicable to the original OSR.

If an OSR folder is lost or inadvertently destroyed, a new OSR folder will be created. Previous information can be obtained from the current office index card and, if applicable, from the card(s) at the previous school(s). A notation will be made in the margin on the front of the new OSR folder that gives the date on which the new folder was created and the reason.

The Ontario Student Transcript is the official record of courses successfully completed and credits gained toward the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Information is updated annually and is part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR).